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Chronic Fatigue treatment?

in by MelindaVInman
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In the summer of 2013 I had Epstein Barr – we didn’t know it at the time. It was later confirmed with blood work. At the time, my doctor assumed I was depressed and burned out and so she treated me as if I were. But I never got better. In fact, I grew worse. My fatigue is worse now than it was a year ago. I’ve had every test and type of bloodwork and have been probed at both ends. I have a very high ANA titer and other common autoimmune symptoms, but nothing fits a pattern to make an easy diagnosis. No specialist seems to be able to diagnosis anything other than CF, and the only treatment seems to be to manage what little energy I have, nap every day, not overbook, and to listen to my body. Is this just the state of my life now? Is there any treatment? Has anyone else in the readership ever experienced CF after Epstein Barr?


About MelindaVInman

Conditions: Chronic Fatigue

Doctors seen: MD – specialist, Chiropractor

Treatment: None Yet

Children: More than 5

Age: 55-64

MelindaVInman
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4 Answers

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I am so sorry to hear about this turn in your health after epstein barr. I know you are not alone and your experience is not at all uncommon, unfortunately. A good friend of mine has chronic fatigue, so I asked her to recommend a few things. Here is what she wrote:
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CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) is a serious health issue, yet many people (and doctors) don't believe it is real. As you probably know the CDC does not currently recognize specific root causes and it is an illness of elimination.

Below are two clinics are are doing amazing things by focusing on treating patients as well as working toward better understanding it. As you will read on their websites EB is one of the believed triggers of CFS, among other viruses.

The best treatment current treatment is full rest and taking a series of Antivirals. The doctors believe that if you don't get complete rest for a period of time of six months or so, a patient does not have a chance to get better. Don't waste time going to doctors that are not specialists in the field. These clinics treat patients all over the world.
Links: http://chronicfatigue.stanford.edu/ and http://openmedicineinstitute.org/

Best of luck

Katie Cleary
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Answered on November 4, 2014

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Hello, Melinda. So sorry to hear about your serious health issue. My son has had CFS for over 10 years, brought on by an okay immune system, a tick bite, and HHV-6(Hespers Virus and Epstein Barr. We have over the years worked with many doctors who have contributed something. First and foremost you need at least 10 hours of very deep sleep and if you need a prescription sleep aid to get it, you must do that. Derek Einlander, my son's doctor, prescribed a microdose of doxipin and a micro dose of klonazapam for him. He doesn't use it now. A vitamin supplementation regime is very important. A really healthy diet is very very important. Not overdoing it and planning ahead to prevent overdoing it is essential. Read Jacob Teitelbaum's book "From Fatigued to Fantastic" for further information. After all the intravenous vitamin treatments, anti virals, and other things he has had, once the virus 'burns itself out', which Susan Levine, MD and CFS specialist in NYC described to us, there may be continued symptoms. She uses antivirals, which were not tremendously effective for Ted, but they may have helped him somewhat.
Now, what he is using which I see a positive effect with is MAF (GC-MAF) injections and Heppapressin injections, self-administered once a week by him, and a special diet (no dairy, no gluten, no 'white' stuff) and 'gut' (large and small intestine) building regime to bolster the immune system. Ted should be taking LDN (Low Dose Naltrexone)at bedtime as prescribed by Derek Enlander, MD, but he is not. It takes time, but I think that we finally found his regime. Yours may be different, but this may be a good place to start.

trudycraney
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Answered on January 5, 2015

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Ooops, I forgot to mention, Melinda, that he is presently under the care, also of Dr. Bruce Bloom of the Bloom Metabolic Institute in White Plains, NY. Dr. Bloom is extremely knowledgable about CFS and chronic diseases, and in addition to the special diet, which is not that limited, actually, he has him on specific prescription powders to rebuild his gut and to burn out any low grade bacterial infections in his body, as well as some vitamin supplementation. Trudy

trudycraney
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Answered on January 5, 2015

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Chronic fatigue syndrome is a very complicated condition and is generally a diagnosis of exclusion, meaning that people are only diagnosed with it when doctors do not have any other explanation for the crippling fatigue that these people experience. Effective treatment for chronic fatigue is very dependent on the person who has it and contributing factors.
Chronic fatigue has many theoretical causes and/or triggering factors. It is long-thought that chronic or acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection could be responsible for causing chronic fatigue syndrome, but there is little evidence supporting that. With that being said, many people with chronic fatigue who have a diagnosis of EBV as well, have seen significant improvement in their symptoms when the EBV was treated. There are also a number of other viruses that have been associated with chronic fatigue, such as human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6), enteroviruses, and coxsackie B virus. These should also be treated with a strong anti-viral treatment if present.

Immune dysfunction and autoimmunity has been closely linked to chronic fatigue as well. If there are antibodies present, but no clear picture to a certain disease, this shows that there is chronic inflammation in the body that can weaken cells and cause generalized fatigue in many people. Most people with chronic autoimmune conditions have severe fatigue from the massive inflammation taking place in their bodies. If this is the case, the autoimmune reaction needs to be reduced and the inflammation needs to subdued. This can be done in many ways, but treatment depends on why it is happening in the first place.

Many chronic autoimmune and inflammatory responses are caused by one or more of the following things: food and environmental allergies, genetic mutations, chronic infections, or heavy metal and chemical toxicity. Each of these aspects needs to be analyzed in a person with chronic inflammation and fatigue and each needs to be treated if it comes up positive. All people with chronic inflammation from autoimmune responses need to also work on healing their intestinal tract, even if there are no intestinal symptoms. This is because a majority of your immune system is present in your gut. If it is not working properly, it can affect the functioning of the immune system.

Overall, treatment of this type of condition is very complicated and requires a partnership with one or more skilled physicians to help you identify triggers and balance out the inflammation in your body.

Jenny Bennett, ND LAc
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Answered on February 10, 2015

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