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Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook Review: A Staple In Your Autoimmune Kitchen

Autoimmune Paleo CookbookThe Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook: An Allergen-Free Approach to Managing Chronic Illness, by Mickey Trescott, NTP is simply beautiful. I love the feel of the cookbook, more than any other that I own. There’s something about the smooth cover that makes me want to open it and choose a recipe that I know will be delicious and make me feel great (no stomach pain! woo hoo!).

And you know a cookbook is well-loved when there are post-it notes marking your favorite recipes, food splatters on the pages, and little notes in the margins. This one is my Velveteen Rabbit of cookbooks.

Excellent Autoimmune Protocol Resource

If you’re looking at going on the autoimmune protocol, this book is a must-have. It takes you through the protocol step by step with a four week meal plan, with a handy list of what’s included in autoimmune paleo and what’s out. I also love the kitchen basics to make sure you’ve got the right tools and foundation ingredients for the recipes.

I cringe admitting this, but I have not done the autoimmune protocol… yet. I just can’t get up the nerve to do it, and I find a zillion reasons why I don’t have time with work, the kids, not enough energy to do all that prep and cooking, you name it. But if I ever did it, this is the book I would follow. I’ve read some other cookbooks and autoimmune protocol meal plans, and the quality of the recipes in this cookbook – the ingredients, steps and difficulty level, and the taste – is so awesome that I trust it would steer me through the four weeks without fail.

Wonderful Meals and Dessert Recipes

So for those among us like me who hobble along with a hybrid autoimmune diet — mostly meat and veggies, but with gluten free grains, eggs, nuts, dairy, and sugar once in a while — the recipes here are best for days that allow time for a solidly good family meal, or for days when your gut needs a clean, filling autoimmune paleo lunch or dinner.

My favorite meal is to make the bone broth on a Friday night in the crock pot, and then make the Rosemary Shredded Beef Skillet on Sunday with the bone broth that finished cooking on Saturday night. So amazing: the perfect fall meal, with the stringy roast beef, the sweet potatoes and zucchini squash. My kids * loved* this dinner when I made it. The only trouble is that I had to find a weekend when we didn’t have a lot going on, since it took a while to prepare all of the pieces (bone broth, shredded roast beef, chopping veggies) and put it together.

AutoimmunePaleoCodAnother favorite we made this past summer was the Coconut Crusted Cod. This was a refreshing way to prepare cod, but it requires some planning too, since you need to make creamy coconut milk to use in the batter. I made this when we were on vacation and we’d been eating out a lot (including after-dinner ice cream cones, ugh) and had a night in. I felt so happy and just clean after eating this meal. If it’s possible for your gut to feel clean after one night of solid eating, this cookbook delivers, whether it’s real or in my head.

A super easy weeknight meal is the Mediterranean Salmon – we take the kalamata olives out of the recipe as my kids are not fans, but it’s a simple five ingredients plus the salmon and you can whip it up quickly and then bake for 15 minutes. The only tough part is that you need a salmon filet that is fairy evenly shaped, as gravity will rule and the mixture of parsley, lemon juice and salt can give some pieces more mixture than others, resulting in uneven flavor.

A meal that the adults loved more than the kids was the Chicken and Pesto Sauté. This one took longer than the book said it would, but it was really good and filling. We modified it for the kids by just giving them the shredded chicken breast, and everyone was happy.

My absolute favorite dessert from this cookbook is one I cannot wait to make again now that it’s fall: the Apple Cranberry Crumble. It’s a 3 out of 4 difficulty level, and I will admit I made some mistakes by not seeing that the coconut oil had to be chilled before I started it, so that made the crumble a little less beautiful than the photo but oh – it was so, so good. I just love having a dessert that doesn’t give me a hypoglycemic flare, but satisfies the sweet tooth I’ve been battling for the last four decades. This recipe wins, hands down.

Overall, The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook is a must-have for any autoimmune kitchen. I don’t always have time to make the recipes I’d want to make with our crazy family schedule during the school year, but on the weekends we can manage it, I feel like I’ve delivered an amazing gift of a wonderful meal to my family. This is a cookbook to own and pass down through the generations.

And if you crave more… Mickey’s Autoimmune-Paleo website and Pinterest page offer new recipes not in the cookbook, along with other fantastic cooking advice and support.

Note to readers: I’ve included two links to buy the cookbook on Amazon. This is my affiliate link, so I will make a tiny bit of $ if you buy the cookbook through these links, which helps me pay for articles written by doctors, nutritionists and other health experts. Thank you! 

 

About the Author
Katie Cleary is founder of AutoimmuneMom.com.  She lives with her autoimmune conditions, family and mini labradoodle dog in Austin, Texas.

This post contains opinions of the author.  AutoimmuneMom.com is not a medical practice and does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  It is your responsibility to seek diagnosis, treatment, and advice from qualified providers based on your condition and particular circumstances.  Camino Real Ventures, Inc., the company that makes AutoimmuneMom.com available to you, does not endorse nor recommend any products, practices, treatment methods, tests, physicians, service providers, procedures, clinical trials, opinions or information available on this website.  Your use of the website is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

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