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Do Estrogen and Progesterone’s Rise and Fall During Your Cycle Create Autoimmune Flares? (Yes, Unfortunately.)

Which hormones fluctuate throughout the month during my cycle – estrogen and progesterone, or just estrogen? The menstrual cycle proceeds through a complicated and highly coordinated dance of hormones.  By convention the cycle begins with menstruation.  During this time, levels of estrogen and progesterone are low.  During the next part of the cycle, levels of estrogen begin to rise, reaching

Breast Cancer’s Ties to Autoimmune: Hashimoto’s, Graves’, Multiple Sclerosis, Autoimmune Arthritis and Lupus

Which autoimmune diseases have a connection to breast cancer incidence? At least one study has shown an increased rate of breast cancer in women with multiple sclerosis. Same as rheumatoid arthritis – researchers at University of North Carolina at Charlotte found a link between metastatic breast cancer and autoimmune arthritis. In another study, ulcerative colitis has shown a tentative association

Celiac & Cancer: How To Lower Your Risk

Does having celiac disease increase my risk of cancer? It may, especially if you are not following a gluten-free diet. People with celiac disease seem to have an elevated risk for cancers of the small intestine, such as small bowel adenocarcinoma (normally a very rare cancer). In some ways this is not surprising, since people with celiac disease have an

How To Have A Great Pregnancy With Scleroderma

Could scleroderma lead to difficulty becoming pregnant? From limited studies, scleroderma may slightly decrease fertility, but these effects are small, if they exist at all.  The disease may also carry a slightly increased chance of miscarriage. What are the risks if I have scleroderma and become pregnant? In the past, many doctors recommended that women with scleroderma avoid pregnancy, as

Thyroid Hormone T3: Why It’s Important + Why It Makes You Feel Better With Hashimoto’s

What is the function of T3? The thyroid gland releases about ten times as much of the thyroid hormone T4 (thyroxine) as T3 (triiodothyronine).  Normally, the liver and kidneys then convert much of the T4 to T3; about three quarters of the T3 circulating in the blood arises from conversion from T4 in these tissues. T3 and T4 appear to